a to z of topics

Use this to access all the topics on the urban design learning space


Browse the glossary using this index

Special | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | ALL

Page: (Previous)   1  ...  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  ...  16  (Next)
  ALL

L

Layout

When considering whether the layout of a place is well-designed, you need to ask:

1. Do the buildings and layout make it easy to find your way around?

2. Does it mesh with its surroundings?

3. Are streets defined by a coherent and well-structured layout?

4. Does it leave unwanted ‘SLOAP’ (space left over after planning)?

5. Are public spaces and routes overlooked and will they feel safe?

Click here to access our lesson on Assessing the design components

LDF content

The LDF needs to include a series of policies that:
  • embed design across the LDF hierarchy and beyond to the community strategy
  • treat design as a cross-cutting theme
  • base design policies on an understanding of local context and design processes
  • recognise design is important at all spatial scales
  • ensure design delivers social and sustainable outcomes

Click here to access our lesson on Local planning policy

Legibility

People are comfortable in places if they understand how to use them. Can I walk on the grass? Is that a crossing? Which way is the station?

Signs can help people understand places, but we use lots of other, more subtle clues too.

Sometimes these are the most important ones, like views, paths that follow desire lines (where people want to walk) or how wide and inviting pavements look. If a place needs lots of signs to tell people how to negotiate their way around, its design has probably failed.

Click here to access our lesson on Recognising the qualities of good places

Legislation

The main national legislation relating to traffic, streets and transport is:
  • The Highways Act 1980
  • The Road Traffic Act 1991
  • The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000
  • The Transport Act 2000 (Section 144)
  • The Traffic Management Act 2004


Click here to access our lesson on Policy and law for traffic and streets

Legislation

The main national legislation relating to traffic, streets and transport is:
  • The Highways Act 1980
  • The Road Traffic Act 1991
  • The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000
  • The Transport Act 2000 (Section 144)
  • The Traffic Management Act 2004
In addition there is more specific legislation relating to traffic signs, signals, junction design and so on.

Click here to access our lesson on Policy and law for traffic and streets

Local considerations

Your project is being created in an existing context and has great power to improve the local environment. You have an opportunity to add value to the neighbourhood by enhancing the physical, economic and social situation surrounding the project and, in doing so, to create a building that itself has greater value over time.

Click here to access our lesson on Commissioning design work

Local planning policy

The Local Development Framework (LDF) is the collective term for a suite of documents that together make up the spatial planning strategy for a local area.

Click here to access our lesson on Local planning policy

London plan (The)

The first RSS produced was the The London Plan prepared by the Greater London Authority and published in 2003.

Click here to access our lesson on Regional planning policy

M

Making an application

Before anyone submits an application they should do a little homework. Understanding the site, the neighbourhood, relevant planning policies, and of course the market and viability of the scheme can help ensure the application is realistic and relevant.

Click here to access our lesson on Planning process

Making balanced decisions about highways schemes

Reaching a balanced decision about streets projects means thinking about a range of issues including:
  • funding systems and opportunities
  • understanding your area as it exists; its qualities, how people use it and how it could be improved
  • considering if the project proposal is appropriate and well designed
This means considering both the quality of the existing area AND the qualities of the proposal. Assessing the existing area will help to show where improvements are needed and justify funding. Assessing the proposal and its likely outcomes should inform decisions to go ahead or alter its design.

Click here to access our lesson on Making balanced decisions about highways schemes

Page: (Previous)   1  ...  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  ...  16  (Next)
  ALL